Learning Modern Languages in the United Kingdom

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Since September 2004, modern دراسة لغة في بريطانيا ​​have been a right, which means, as explained above, that schools must offer students the opportunity to study a language up to GCSE. However, in practice, schools approach this new government policy very differently from each other. The main teachers of the comprehensive schools have the possibility to implement the decision in various ways, and for example, in the specialized language school, the teaching of modern foreign languages ​​in key stage 4 remains compulsory. At school Z, where the number of options offered is limited, students who choose textiles have to learn a language. There are schedule restrictions, making any other combination impossible. Therefore, students are often resentful, as they feel that what should have been a choice has been imposed on them.

Some other core teachers promote language learning and ensure that it is valued in the school and community, and thus manage to keep the number of candidates who decide to enter a language GCSE quite high. This is often the case in middle-class areas of influence where families understand and support the benefits of learning a language.

That معاهد لغة في بريطانيا who have suffered the most from this decision are comprehensive schools in more disadvantaged areas, where the resource that languages ​​can be, especially for improving literacy skills, is not understood. Some schools even withdraw students who have Special Educational Needs for Languages ​​lessons in order to provide additional support in English. At School Z, the Literacy Coordinator agrees on the importance of offering children the ability to learn a language and has advised the Special Education Needs Coordinator to avoid removing them from the lessons.

Students acquire transferable skills in modern foreign languages, and this should be further explained to the general public.

Schools often aim to increase performance in terms of numbers, and in this concern, the actual learning process is ignored. Modern foreign language teachers sometimes have to deal with misbehavior in lessons, due to the perception of the subject. This is directly related to the inability to practice speaking and listening skills in some contexts, which implies that students will perform poorly when evaluated. Students are established according to ability in most schools, and the group labeled "bottom set" is often a mix of low-achieving and misbehaving students. However, this also has a negative impact on the self-esteem of the students. 

Some language schools, but also some comprehensive schools, have decided to ignore language rights in Key Stage 4 by creating fast-track sections in which students take their GCSE exams at the end of year 9. In year 7, students are established at Christmas, and the lessons of the fast-track groups are adapted immediately to progress at a faster pace. Other students are in mixed skill sets. Students who take their exams at the end of Key Stage 3 are also learning a second language, which follows the main teaching routine, and are finally tested at the end of Year 11.

The baccalaureate in English, which is a suggested route, seems to follow the lines of the current level A system firmly.

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